chocolates

blonde chocolate and sea salt (the chocolate society)

brics de sal  (blanxart)

cardamom organic white chocolate artisan bar (rococo)

cioccolato bianco con pistacchi, nocciole e mandorle salati (venchi)

d-fusion lattesal (domori)

fleur de sel (gepa)

kristálysó (crystal salt) (rózsavölgyi csokoládé)

potato chip bar (chuao chocolatier)

melk karamell zeezout (tony’s chocolonely)

milk chocolate with caramel and fleur de sel (bovetti)

rose salt + lemon (antidote)

sambirano valley 50% with fleur de sel (benoît nihant)

sea salt organic milk chocolate artisan bar (rococo)

I’ve always liked the taste of sweet and salty things, as growing up in Spain all we had was salted butter and I missed it when living in Germany. One of my favourite breakfast treats has been and still is a toast/bagel/croissant (whatever is available) with salted butter and Nutella. Fortunately salted butter has become very common and many manufacturers are selling both salted and unsalted butter in Germany now. I love chocolate chip cookies with salt flakes, caramel beurre salé candy and ice cream and I tend to buy anything else that has fleur de sel in it (recently: cream cheese) but now I’ve developed a real obsession with salted chocolate.

I tried a chocolate with fleur de sel a year or two ago which I bought at what in Germany is commonly known as a Bioladen (a health food store, probably something like a Whole Foods Market) but I wasn’t really enthusiastic about it then. But because a friend of mine is a fan of chocolate with high cocoa percentages I’m always on the lookout for different chocolates when I travel. On one of those occasions I bought a salted milk chocolate which ultimately got me hooked. I’ve never been very partial to dark chocolate, white and milk chocolate being my favourites – but as salted chocolate seems to be my new passion, I will give them all a try. Luckily most chocolatiers and bean to bar producers now seem to have at least one salted chocolate in their repertoire, which is great and terrible at the same time – I want to try them all!

I don’t know very much (yet?) about chocolate and chocolate production and I don’t think my taste buds are refined enough to tell the difference between chocolate made from Madagascan or Ecuadorean beans but I would still like to share my favourite (and not so favourite) finds with you. My friend (who is partly to blame for this addiction) on the other hand, knows a lot about and prefers all the chocolates that I don’t, so I’m hoping to convince him to share his thoughts here too.

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